Terrordise is in the running for best screenplay at the Ojo Cojo International Film Festival

The First International Film Festival of Madrid to promoting intercultural dialogue.

Terrordise, a dark political comedy

screenplay by V. N. Alexander

Spanish translation by Xiomara Nonya

In the year 2028, close circuit cameras are everywhere and smiling citizens submit to intrusive body searches and bag checks by TSA agents, who now handle security at malls, stadiums, bus and train stations, as well as airports. President Clinton-Bush is winning the war on terror, according to billboards, and the surveillance state makes citizens feel safe. Continue reading

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Terrordise nominated for TheModCon London Film Festival

laurel-nominatedTerrordise, a dark comedy by V. N. Alexander has been nominated for Best Screenplay  in TheModCom London Film Festival.

Synopsis: The Schwartz-Johnson family can’t wait to get to their new home in Paradise, a high-security gated community in Dallas, Texas. They are willing to sacrifice privacy for the ultimate in safety against any kind of terror threat –until Mr. & Mrs. Schwartz-Johnson are accused of terrorism themselves.

TheModCon London Film Festival aims to “promote and recognize those that have walked the extra mile and shown commitment to the international community to inspire others to take action in solving some of the many conflicts we face today.”

V.N. Alexander is a fan of Wes Anderson and Monty Python, and counts Napoleon Dynamite by Jared Hess and Canadian Bacon by Micheal Moore among her favorite comedy films.

Find out more about “Terrodise” here.

2016 Top 20: Fine Lines: Vladimir Nabokov’s Scientific Art

The Book/Arts blog of the prestigious journal Nature has included Fine Lines in its top 20 book list for 2016.

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Fine Lines was also review in Doppiozero in Italy, Haibun in Romania, and science and art blog, and made the top 20 list bioteaching.com

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Art and science, artificial intelligence and propaganda

The mission of New York Council for the Humanities (NYCH) is to reach general, diverse audiences, providing them with  engaging speakers on important humanities topics that everyone will find interesting or useful.  Any non-profit organization in New York state can request a NYCH Public Scholar to speak, at no cost to the host organization.  I am currently serving as a Public Scholar (2015-2017) and I offer three topics (below) which I can adapt to any audience, if desired. If you are interested in hosting one of these lectures, contact the Council. There is an application and a small application fee, but don’t let that  dissuade you. The fee can be waived if requested, and if you need help with the application you can contact me at alexander (at) dactyl (dot) org

deadleaf_mimic-jpg_credit_rahul_k_natuNabokov’s Unorthodox Theory of Insect Mimicry: why science needs more artists 
photo credit: Rahul K. Natu

It’s a commonplace to say that good science requires imagination, yet scientist aren’t really encouraged to read poetry or to take up painting.  Maybe they should.  This talk will present the example of Vladimir Nabokov, renown Russian-American novelist and butterfly scientist who used his artistic knowledge to understand how evolution can work. He went against the prevailing theories of his day and was attacked for being unscientific, but recently some of his work has been vindicated by DNA analysis, showing that his artistic guesses were amazingly accurate and precise. Continue reading