Tag Archives: self-organization

Smithsonian Magazine reviews Fine Lines

smithsonian

 

Vladimir Nabokov might be best known as a novelist, specifically as the author of Lolita, but what many might not know is that one of his deepest passions was studying butterflies.

Now, a new book from Yale University Press honors his dedication to the delicate creatures. The book, Fine Lines, is a collection of more than 150 of his scientific illustrations of butterflies, rivaling John James Audubon in their detail.

Read more…

May 11, VN Alexander on Nabokov at Library in Rosendale, NY

rosendale WEDNESDAY, MAY 11 7 PM FREE

“Vladimir Nabokov and Insect Mimicry: The Artist as Scientist”

Victoria N Alexander

Public Scholars, NY Council for the Humanities: In collaboration with the NY Council for the Humanities, the Rosendale Public Library presents a slide/lecture on the controversial novelist and lepidopterist, Vladimir Nabokov, that reveals his insights into the mysteries of mimicry and how the scientific community responded to his studies. Fantastic images of insect mimicry will be used as examples of how important art is to good science. This event is made possible through the Public Scholars program with support from the National Endowment for the Humanities.

rosendalelibrary

 

VN Alexander Interviewed on Yale Radio with Brainard Carey

WYBCX The Art World Demystified, Hosted by Brainard Carey
YaleRadio
In this 45 min interview, VN Alexander’s talks with Brainard about why art  is so important to learning, about the little-known “artistic” evolutionary mechanisms (other than mutation/gradual selection) that help create new species, about what the term “intelligence” in “artificial intelligence” means, about the difference between computer algorithms and poetic thinking –and lots more.

Fine Lines reviewed in Nature, The New Yorker and Washington Post

Blackwell FineLines200My favorite novelist, Vladimir Nabokov, is also my favorite evolutionary theorist.  There is a fine line between art and science.  In this beautiful coffee-table book, edited by Stephen Blackwell and Kurt Johnson, I have an essay called, “Chance, Nature’s Practical Jokes and the ‘Non-utilitarian Delights’ of Insect Mimicry.”

Fine Lines: Vladimir Nabokov’s Scientific Art hit the bookstores this week.  So far it’s been favorably reviewed in The New Yorker and the Washington Post.

And in Nature:

Nature Fine Lines 531304a